And the 2017 RIMS Awards Go to…

PHILADELPHIA—At today’s RIMS 2017 Awards Luncheon, the society issued its top honors for achievement in the risk management and insurance industry.

Scott B. Clark, area senior vice president and enterprise risk management consultant at Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., received the society’s most prestigious honor, the Harry and Dorothy Goodell Award. Named after RIMS’ first president, the award recognizes outstanding service and achievement in furthering the goals of the society and the discipline of risk management.

Richard Hackenburg and Glen Frederick were this year’s inductees into the Risk Management Hall of Fame, presented in conjunction with AIG.

In his 45-year risk management career, including leadership roles at Willis and XL Insurance, Hackenberg’s received the 1993 Goodell Award and served as president of RIMS in 1985 and later as chairman of the Spencer Educational Foundation, where he remains a director emeritus.

Frederick, former director of risk management client services with the government of British Columbia, received the Goodell Award in 2011 and, the same year, the Donald M. Stuart award for outstanding contribution to the risk management profession in Canada. He served as chair of the RIMS Canada Council in 2006 and co-chair of the RIMS Canada Conference in 2003. Frederick’s 30-year career also included leading implementation of the enterprise risk management strategy for the Vancouver organizing committee (VANOC) and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to manage risks associated with the 2010 Olympic Games—the first to use an ERM strategy, which is now required for all Olympic games.

“Industry heroes like Richard Hackenburg and Glen Frederick were selfless, giving back to the risk management community and paving the way for future practitioners,” said RIMS CEO Mary Roth. “It is an honor to join AIG in inducting these risk management stalwarts into the Risk Management Hall of Fame.”

The RIMS Rising Star Award, issued to risk management professionals who are under 35 or have less than seven years of experience in the industry, was given to William Lehman. An insurance specialist at Cook Group Incorporated, Lehman was recognized for demonstrating exceptional initiative, volunteerism, professional development, achievement, and leadership potential.

Debra Samuel, manager of insurance and risk management at Arconic Inc., was recognized for exceptional service to strengthen and support the strategic initiatives of RIMS with the RIMS Ambassadors Group award. This year’s Cristy Award for the highest marks on the three Associate of Risk Management exams went to Michael Ratto, risk procurement manager at Kraemer North America.

Can ORSA Work For All Businesses?

In addition to impacting the way countless organizations conduct business, the 2008 financial crisis was an awakening for regulators charged with reviewing and setting the rules that shape the way organizations assume risk. Insurance, perhaps the riskiest business of them all, did not go unscathed.

Not only are insurers responsible for managing their own internal risks, but careful calculations and guidelines are built into their business models to ensure that the risks fall within set parameters. Regulators will argue, however, that this wasn’t always the case.

Own Risk Solvency Assessment (ORSA) was adopted and now serves as an internal process for insurers to assess their risk management processes and make sure that, under severe scenarios, they remains solvent.

U.S. insurers required to perform an ORSA must file a confidential summary report with their lead state’s department of insurance.  The assessment aims to demonstrate and document the insurer’s ability to:

  • Withstand financial and economic stress with a quantitative and qualitative assessment of exposures
  • Effectively apply enterprise risk management (ERM) to support decisions
  • Provide insights and assurance to external stakeholders

While ORSA is requirement for insurers, a new study by RIMS and the Property Casualty Insurers Association, Communicating the Value of Enterprise Risk Management: The Benefits of Developing an Own Risk and Solvency Assessment Report, maintains that ORSA can be used for all organizations looking to strengthen their ERM function.

According to the report:

Whether or not required by regulation or standard-setting bodies, documenting the following internal practices is a worthwhile endeavor for any company in any sector to utilize in their goal to preserve and create value:

  • Enterprise risk management capabilities

  • A solid understanding of the risks that can occur at catastrophic levels related to the chosen strategy

  • Validation that the entity has adequately considered such risks and has plans in place to address those risks and remain viable.

The connection between the ORSA regulation imposed on insurers and the development of an ERM program within an organization outside of the insurance industry is apparent.

ORSA and ERM both require the organization to strengthen communication between business functions. Breaking down those silos are key to uncovering business risk, but perhaps more importantly, is the interconnectedness of those risks.

Secondly, similar to ERM in non-insurance companies, ORSA requires risk management to document its findings, processes and strategies. Such documentation allows for the process of managing risks to be effectively communicated to operations, senior leadership, regulators and stakeholders. Additionally, documentation enhances monitoring efforts, the ability to make changes to the program and is a benefit that allows ERM to reach a “repeatable” maturity level as defined by the RIMS Risk Maturity Model.

Developing an ERM program has become a priority for many organizations as senior leaders recognize the value of having their entire organization thinking, talking and incorporating risk management into their work. Examining and implementing ORSA strategies can be an effective way for risk professionals to get their ERM program off the ground and operational.

Temple University Wins 2016 Spencer-RIMS Challenge

spencer rims challenge 2016

SAN DIEGO—A team of students from Temple University won this year’s Spencer-RIMS Risk Management Challenge, concluding a three-month case-study challenge against 20 other universities. Team members Andrew Donchez, Carolyn Murset, Sean Preis and Zilong Zhao, advised by Associate Professor R. B. Drennan, will take home the competition’s $4,000.

This year, Lego provided a case study for teams from 21 universities to studied the risk portfolio and develop an array of proposed solutions. Eight teams were then invited to attend the RIMS 2016 Conference here in San Diego to present their findings to judges and an audience of risk professionals.

“All of the students who took part in the Spencer-RIMS Risk Challenge are winners,” said Ron Davis, the newly elected chair of the Spencer Educational Foundation. “Each university team was prepared, smart and successfully delivered innovative risk management solutions for a very complex situation. It is truly rewarding to see them have the opportunity to shine during this competition and validates the critical work we do to support tomorrow’s risk management professionals.”

“This competition reinforces that the risk management profession’s future is bright,” said RIMS CEO Mary Roth. “The Rising Risk Professional demographic of RIMS members continues to grow and their contributions and professional needs have directly influenced the resources and opportunities the Society delivers. We are so proud to be able to introduce these students to the energy and excitement of a RIMS Annual Conference and congratulate all of them for participating in the challenge.”

Second place went to Florida State University, while the team from Butler University took third. The Temple team won $4,000, FSU $3,000 and Butler $2,000 for their achievements.